Other than used stamps/clothes/books is there anything else that can be recycled for charities to make money on?

by , 19 Aug 2010Open Question

I started a thread on where used stamps could be sent to make money for charities. I already put our used clothes out for the local air ambulance, and I was wondering what other things could be recycled by the charities for money?

Answers

add your answer here

Charity shops are full of bric-?rac, records and other forms of music. Also jewellery, shoes and kids toys. Anything really as long as it's in reasonably good nick.

by Rosie, 19 Aug 2010

I agree becuase it is us who are benefiting from that. What is no longer needed by one is another find.

by pmscot93, 19 Aug 2010
add a comment

I don't know if anyone watched, a while back, on TV, a programme about charity shops. An expert was drafted to give the charity shop a makeover. One of the points that was made is that charity shops are often given - even with the best intention - stuff that is only fit for the bin. While it's good to give to charity we all should consider - is it worth anything!?

by Rosie, 19 Aug 2010

Yes it is not a dumping bin. And it is best not to leave overnight for the weather to ruin and others to pick over.

by pmscot93, 19 Aug 2010
add a comment

If you sell something on ebay you can select the proceeds to go to a selected charity. I also presume that ebay cut or even wipe off the commission they would normally charge. That's what I would do for items that can't be taken to a charity shop.

by ryancarte, 19 Aug 2010

Yes that is really good. It is a separate part of ebay isn't it Ryan?

by pmscot93, 19 Aug 2010

yes it is, but as far as I'm aware it's still controlled and maintained by Ebay.

by ryancarte, 19 Aug 2010
add a comment

Charities take almost everything but some specilise. Some take furniture others don't. Rosie is right that we should perhaps take a little care with what we give for instance sewing buttons and washing etc. But I think that prog Mary Queen of Shops was it? gave a slightly false impression. Yes they won't saleable goods. Buy they also make money from clothes that are unsaleable because they sell as rags. And some make considerable amounts in this way. As they say where ther's muck there's brass. Phones and cartridges are also things that can be sent to charities which you will find by googling.

by pmscot93, 19 Aug 2010

I didn't realise they made money in that way. On that show they had to pay a huge amount on refuse collection for stuff they couldn't sell! Maybe that was unrealistic tho

by Rosie, 19 Aug 2010

Yes I am sure they wd have to pay refuse collection. But people cerainly used to buy rags I suppose it may be just cotton wool etc. I don't know. Synthetics probably are junk. Cerainly the message to the public is please give us stuff we can sell even if there are other ways to deal with the unsaleable stuff

by pmscot93, 20 Aug 2010
add a comment

With the introduction of the Euro a few years ago there must be loads of old currency that people have left over, could this be a money spinner for charity shops selling it to collectors?

Other than that anything that you don't need but is still usable/wearable could be worth something to someone so could be donated to shops. Also, how about doing a car boot sale and with the money you end up with donate it to charity. This might even encourage people to not barter and pay a fair price?

by MarkX, 19 Aug 2010

Oxfam takes wool that it gives away for people to make into jumpers or blankets for the charity. My mother in law made hundreds of jumpers for them.
Our Co-op has a box for collecting batteries for recycling but I'm not sure whether this is for a charity.

by roseangel, 19 Aug 2010

All shops (I think) that sell batteries should have facilities to collect used batteries. This is because they should not be thrown in the household waste bin as they should not go into landfill. They have poisonous materials in them (cannot remember what) and need specialist disposal.

Similarly, shops that sell low energy light bulbs should also offer collection facilities because again they should not be thrown away in the household waste. I believe that these have Mercury in them so they need specialist disposal facilities.

by Susancrane, 20 Aug 2010
add a comment

Oxfam take used printer cartridges, coins (foreign and UK), used stamps, spectacles and mobile phones. They also have a special arrangement with M&S, whereby if you donate at least one item of M&S clothing to any Oxfam shop (including Oxfam book shops) Oxfam will give you a ?5 money off voucher to use in M&S. You do have to spend a minimum of ?35 in M&S to redeem the voucher though.

by fruitcake, 20 Aug 2010

Years ago when I was a child I remember that we used to collect the foil tops off milk bottles that were given to charity (I have no idea which one this was now) but I don't think this is common practice nowadays. There is also a very good market for lead/copper but I am not aware of any specific charities that may ask for donations of this kind.

by frenchwoodgirl, 20 Aug 2010

It was guide dogs for the blind that collected the foil. We used to collect it too.

by roseangel, 20 Aug 2010

Thank you so much for reminding me!! I have been wondering about this all day!

by frenchwoodgirl, 20 Aug 2010
add a comment

a very good thing for charity shops has got to be cd's and dvd's they can easily sell them and get the much needed cash

by smartcar, 20 Aug 2010

Ink jet cartridges and old foreign currency seems to be the preferences in my area. At the end of the day anything from stamps to motor vehicles can be made use of by charitable organisations.

by Noddy1, 20 Aug 2010

Sorry I cannot add much more than has already been added, but if you are clearing out cupboards, and you find bits of ribbon, buttons, nice pieces of material, don't forget your local playgroup,pre-school may be grateful.

by lakes, 20 Aug 2010

Charity shops are still taking old VHS pre-recorded videos (eg films/documentaries), records and books. The national ones are getting really good at sorting out to identify items that can be sold at a better price in specialist shops.

If it is old but unsaleable (say like a laundry post) then check whether your local museum knows anywhere that might like it. Similarly clothes that the charities may not be able to sell because they are too old but that are in reasonable condition may be of interest either to your local theatre group or to museums (to dress exhibits).

by Susancrane, 20 Aug 2010

just about everything! the only things ive heard being rejected are sex toys, old food and stained undergarments! something else i spotted in click was stuffyourrucksack.com which if you are going on holiday you can bring some vital supplies.

by katkity, 20 Aug 2010

I've just had a look at that website, what a brilliant and simple idea! It's definitely worth doing if you're an intrepid traveller and go to places that so desperately need help.

by roseangel, 20 Aug 2010

thats what i thought! :) i hope people do it, im planning on it next time i go somewhere with a requirement! :)

by katkity, 20 Aug 2010
add a comment

Anything and everything really, there's always something someone else will take off your hands for a copper or two, another mans rubbish is another mans gold as they say.

by familily4tunes, 26 Nov 2012

Posts within the money.co.uk community represent the views, experiences and opinions of members and experts only. They should not be taken as financial advice and should not be followed without further research.

Get our free money saving newsletter
Join over 450,000 other subscribers who grab our expert money tips, unmissable money guides & hottest bargains each week in our special email...

More Questions on Charity Donation

Join Our Community

Get fast answers to your money questions, Expert insight, top tips & much more...

Win an iPad Air!

Enter our competition to win an iPad Air by answering a question in our community.

The more questions you answer the better your chance of winning.

Terms & Conditions